Chemistry is Confusing, and Has Been for Centuries

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Did you know chemists in the 1700-1800’s were confused by the elements they were discovering?  How are they related?  How can they be organized?

Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev grew up in a Siberian household around 16 brothers and sisters, so he knew a thing or two about confusion!

This isn’t Dmitri’s family, but a houseful of 11 children must have been a bit chaotic!

This isn’t Dmitri’s family, but a houseful of 11 children must have been a bit chaotic!

In 1869 Mendeleev sat down and made flash cards of all 65 known elements.  Surely there is a way to organize the elements in a pattern or chart! 

This is Mendeleev’s actual desk. He slept in his office also, of course.

This is Mendeleev’s actual desk. He slept in his office also, of course.

He sat for hours at his desk moving the flash cards around, until he fell asleep.  He awoke with the answer!  Here’s what he said: 

In a dream I saw a table where all the elements fell into place as required. Awakening, I immediately wrote it down on a piece of paper.

Dmitri Mendeleev. Chemist. Dreamer.

Dmitri Mendeleev. Chemist. Dreamer.

We cannot succeed in school by sleeping on our notes. And, in reality, Mendeleev had been pondering the order of the elements for over 20 years. See, it takes work to learn or create something!

Joy Lab has a FREE guidebook Unlock the mystery of the Periodic Table. Download it, study it, and end periodic table confusion!

cHEMISTS CAN ALSO HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR

cHEMISTS CAN ALSO HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR

Chemistry is Hard

Learn Something New with online video courses!  Share Your Passion by creating online video courses!

Passing chemistry is possible, but it is not easy!

  • You take notes in class.

  • You do the homework.

  • You ask questions.

  • You go to your professor's office hours.

It simply takes lots of time working many chemistry problems.  Here is a sample video tutorial.  Use this to help you with your next dimensional anaylysis problem.